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Bushido philosophy quotes

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1 Bushido philosophy quotes on Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:10 pm

ITT, we should post quotes by warriors and martial artists that really hit home. I'll start with two by Nakayama Hakudo, the founder of Muso Shinden Ryu Iaido, 18th Soke of Hasegawa Eishin Ryu Iaijutsu, and the only member of the Zen Nihon Kendo Renmei to receive 10th dan in iaido, kendo, and jodo:

At the end of World War II, Nakayama was quick to advise Japanese people to greet Allied troops with grace, saying samurai never mouthed what was finished. Said he:
“In fencing we call this spirit 'ohen' or adapting one's self to the change. In other words, it is a condition where after realizing and acknowledging the natural tide of affairs, all past ambitions are given up and a state of nothingness is reached. This requires magnanimity of heart. It is the ultimate meaning of the art of fencing. We must greet the Allied Army with just such a spirit. Yesterday they were enemies but today they are no longer so. If we cannot think of them as being no longer enemies, then it cannot be said that we truly understand the spirit of bushido. If there is the least feeling of ill-will harbored in our hearts and if we cannot take a broad outlook, it is bound to show in our faces and attitude, giving reason for others to think of us as cowardly. I believe that the greatness of a nation lies in its broadminded attitude.”

Next one is more about his teachings than it is by him but it's awesome:
"The ethics of swordsmanship, Mr. Nakayama wishes to clarify, is not in aggressive manslaughter. It lies primarily in psychic training. In the same manner in which the Yogis developed their physical inhibition to attain meditative states for higher psychical conditions, kendo trains the nervous system to respond, making awkward conscious efforts into reflex. The instrument, the sword, is necessary to give that serious frame of mind. What is more serious than life as forfeit for mistakes or inattention? The cold, mirror-like glimmer of the blade facing you, you cannot but be serious. The behavioristic school of psychology is well in accordance to this principle."

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2 Re: Bushido philosophy quotes on Mon Aug 23, 2010 11:33 pm

Morihei Ueshiba, the founder Aikido, is considered one of the great men of Bushido. He received the Kyoju Dairi or representative license in Daito ryu Aikijujutsu which at the time was that tradition's highest achievement. He was Takeda Sokaku's most long term, most famous, and easily one of the most talented pupils in Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu. Along with this, Ueshiba studied spearmenship, kenjutsu, jodo, and other styles of jujutsu. He was a very close friend of Nakayama Hakudo, the founder of muso shinden iaido.

* A good stance and posture reflect a proper state of mind.
* There are no contests in the Art of Peace. A true warrior is invincible because he or she contests with nothing. Defeat means to defeat the mind of contention that we harbor within.
* To injure an opponent is to injure yourself. To control aggression without inflicting injury is the Art of Peace.
* When an opponent comes forward, move in and greet him; if he wants to pull back, send him on his way.
* The Way of the Warrior has been misunderstood. It is not a means to kill and destroy others. Those who seek to compete and better one another are making a terrible mistake. To smash, injure, or destroy is the worst thing a human being can do. The real Way of a Warrior is to prevent such slaughter — it is the Art of Peace, the power of love.
* Aiki is not a technique to fight with or defeat an enemy. It is the way to reconcile the world and make human beings one family.
* True Budo is practiced not only to destroy an enemy, it must also make him, or his own will, gladly lose his spirit (seishin) to oppose you.
* When facing the realm of life and death in the form of an enemy's sword, one must be firmly settled in mind and body, and not at all intimidated; without providing your opponent the slightest opening, control his mind in a flash and move where you will — straight, diagonally, or in any other appropriate direction.

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3 Re: Bushido philosophy quotes on Tue Sep 07, 2010 10:25 pm

Risuke Otake of Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu (one of the oldest koryu bujutsu, dating back to the middle Muromachi period) said in an interview with the BBC that the style's founder, Iizasa Chōisai Ienao, taught that the true way of the sword is one of peace. Otake Sensei also feels that the popular idea of Bushido is over-romantic and misleading:

"Outside of Japan, people think Bushido is synonymous with harakiri. Actually, the meaning of Bushido is to achieve something in this world and then to be able to throw away this body and accept death. But this concept is very easily misunderstood. It's really quite different from just going out and dying. If you fail to achieve something and say "Oh, I must kill myself" it's not a very productive way of thinking. Bushido rejects that irresponsible way of thinking. There is also in Bushido the concept of continuing to live even though you may have to live in shame. If there is a way to right the wrong you've done, then you should do so. This is the real Bushido."

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4 Re: Bushido philosophy quotes on Fri Oct 08, 2010 10:42 pm

Osu. It's a term I use quite frequently. I was going to try explaining it but i think this article does it alot better.

Osu!
^article

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5 Re: Bushido philosophy quotes on Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:15 pm

Kinyama Fukuhiko wrote:Osu. It's a term I use quite frequently. I was going to try explaining it but i think this article does it alot better.

Osu!
^article


or in short..

I'M PAYING ATTENTION YES SIR!! BELIEVE IT!! affraid

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6 Re: Bushido philosophy quotes on Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:34 pm

Akaryuu Kotaka wrote:
Kinyama Fukuhiko wrote:Osu. It's a term I use quite frequently. I was going to try explaining it but i think this article does it alot better.

Osu!
^article


or in short..

I'M PAYING ATTENTION YES SIR!! BELIEVE IT!! affraid
oh god, definitely not believe it. lol.

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7 Re: Bushido philosophy quotes on Fri Oct 08, 2010 11:46 pm

i was referring to Naruto lol - in the Japanese version (much less lame) when the leader says they have to do something, and it's serious mode kick-butt time, they would say Ossu!

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8 Re: Bushido philosophy quotes on Sat Oct 09, 2010 12:01 am

ah. i knew there was a reference to naruto but i didn't know they used Osu as an affirmative in the show. It's fairly uncommon outside of karate dojo's so i find that interesting. generally, in colloquial japanese, Osu is a contraction of Ohayogozaimasu and is viewed as very rude when used with anyone other than a peer.

to quote myself in the WOTS forums:

In karate (particularly in Kyokushin) it is used as a greeting, an acknowledgment of a command, a positive response to a question, and various other responses. It comes along with the more modern idea of training your hardest, finding your limit, and surpassing it. A philosophy of constantly developing both physical and mental toughness.

The phrase is actually quite foreign for traditional samurai arts. Karate practitioners often train till their knuckles bleed and their forearms are bruised. Samurai didn't have the luxury of training that hard. For Samurai, being crippled by training, even for a day or two, could spell your demise. That was one day where your enemy could cut you down and you would be defenseless. Realistically speaking, cuts and bruises take much longer to heal than a day but even in the best case scenario, you were doomed.

Alot of samurai arts depend more on understanding of the technique, muscle memory, and speed than they do on muscular strength. The worst that would happen after a particularly vigorous keiko would be some muscle soreness that would clear up in a day or two. If you really understood your training, though, it would still be possible to defend yourself in a fatigued state.

Okinawan martial arts are quite different. Karate is an atemi art. That is to say, the curriculum is based on striking more than anything else. Punching makiwara and big rocks was pretty common in many old styles. The practices are still found in Goju ryu and Uechi ryu karate styles. Having your teacher beat you for the express purpose of becoming stronger. When he asks if you want to stop, you shout "OSU!" and he keeps going until he thinks you're done. This is a very karate mindset.

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