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Read This. It might just change you.

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1 Read This. It might just change you. on Wed Feb 03, 2010 2:50 pm

You will read these and think I am biased. Not so. Read these and take them to heart not because it is Marine Corps policy, but because it is something you can incorporate into your life. These are the Marine Corps Leadership Principles.

Take these in context. Apply them to Satsu.

Princple 1: Be technically and tactfully proficient.
Simple Stated, know your job thoroughly. Round out your military Education by attending Marine Corps school, participating in correspondence courses through the Marine Corps Institute (MCI), and understaking other forms on self study. In other words prepare yourself for the next rank.

Principle 2: Know yourself and seek self-improvement
Good leaders know what their strengths and weaknesses; determine yours. Sit down and make an honest assessment of yourself. Ask your immeadiate supervisor(diamyo) for feed back on your performance. Once you identify an area you can improve, make every effort to improve.

Princple 3: Know your Marines and look out for their welfare
You have to know the Marines you work with just as mush as senior leaders must know their subordinates. Even as a Private(noob) or PFC(been attending for awhile) in a fire team, you must know the other Marines in your team and look out for their welfare. They must do the same for you. Teamwork is the name of the game in the Corps, so make every effort to become better acquainted with your fellow Marines.

Principle 4: Keep your Marines informed
When knowledge is shared, it encourages teamwork and enhances morale. Therefore, you should pass the word when you can.

Principle 5: SET THE EXAMPLE
Marines instinctively look to their leaders for patterns of conduct. Others will look at the pride you show in the Corps and in being a Marine. Set the example for your fellow Marines with your personal habits. Don't use profanity just because others do. Be loyal to your seniors, peers, and subordinates. Most IMPORTANTLY, set the examplr of MORAL COURAGE.

Principle 6: Ensure that the task is understood, supervised, and accomplished
Issueing the order is the easiest part of a leader's responsibilities. Far more important is to make sure that order is properly executed and the assigned task properly performed. In doing so, the leader must strike a balance between not enough supervision and too much.

Principle 7: Train your Marines as a team. TEAM.
A unit works BEST when it works as a team, with each member CARRYING HIS OR HER SHARE OF THE LOAD. THE LEADER KNOWS EVERY JOB ON THE TEAM and trains Marines to perform and react, to assist one another, and ensure the mission is accomplished.

Principle 8: Make sound and timely decisions
ONCE YOU MAKE A DECISION, YOUR RESPONSIBILITY IS TO INITIATE ACTION AND GET THE JOB DONE. Anticipate that changes may have to be made to even the best plans. Be prepared to adapt quickly and get on with the operation. You also have a responsibility to make tactful suggestions to your seniors so that they can have the best possible information upon which to base their decisions.

Principle 9: Devolp a sense of responsibility in your subordinates
THE LEADER OF A UNIT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EVERYTHING THE UNIT DOES OR FAILS TO DO. The leader can and should delegate authority, but can never delegate responsibility. Any effort to evade responsibility will detroy bonds of loyalty and respect which exists between the leader and subordinates.

Principle 10: Employ your command in accordance with its capabilities
KNOW YOUR UNIT'S CAPABILITIES. But when the situation DEMANDS, Marines MAY SOMETIMES(Why not all the time Satsu?) have to be pushed far beyond their normal capabilities in order to exploit a victory or to avoid a costly defeat. Marine Corps History is replete with examples of small units accomplishing the SEEMINGLY impossible.

Principle 11: TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR ACTIONS
Take initiative and look for MORE responsibility. Use this chain of command when you have problems or need advice. RESIST GETTING ANGRY IF SOMEONE CORRECTS ERRORS IN YOUR WORK OR QUESTIONS YOUR JUDGEMENT. Instead, learn from the incident and avoid making the same mistake again. YOUR LEADERS ARE WATCHING TO DETERMINE IF YOU CAN HANDLE INCREASED RESPONSIBILITY. BE READY WHEN THEY GIVE IT TO YOU. REMEMBER EACH MARINE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE UNIT.

If you have read this I want you to pick one , two, three, or all to breakdown and post for others to analyze. This is what Satsu seemed to be built on. Let us share the knowledge.

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2 Re: Read This. It might just change you. on Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:40 pm

I think this fits perfectly. Wisdom that can easily be used in Satsu and should be used.

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3 Re: Read This. It might just change you. on Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:23 pm

Hyahhhhh Hyahhhhhhh.....


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Corruption causes justice to appear as insanity. - Saito Hajime, "Samurai X: Trust & Betrayl"
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